CLARK FORK RIVERFRONT
Southside Trail
Northside Trail

BLUE MOUNTAIN RECREATION AREA
Maclay Flat Interpretive Trail
Forest Roads No. 365 and No. 2137
Blue Mountain Nature Trail
Blue Mountain National Recreation Trail
Motor Vehicle Trails

SOUTH HILLS TRAIL SYSTEM
Meadow Hill Trail
Ravenwood Park Trail
Peery Park, Moose Can Gully Trails
High Park Loop

MOUNT SENTINEL
Kim Williams Trail
"M" Trail
Mount Sentinel Fire Road
Mo Z Trail
Pengelly Ridge Trail
Hellgate Canyon Trail

SOUTH MISSOULA
Bitterroot Branch Trail
Tower Complex Trail
South Avenue Trail
Raven Park Trail
Larchmont Trail

PATTEE CANYON RECREATION AREA
Sam Braxton Trail
Crazy Canyon Trail
Northside Trails
Southside Ski Trails

RATTLESNAKE NATIONAL
RECREATION AREA and WILDERNESS

Main Travel Corridor
Spring Gulch/Stuart Peak Trail
Woods Gulch/Sheep Mountain Trail
Sawmill/Curry Trail System

RATTLESNAKE VALLEY
Greenough Park Trails
Routes North of Greenough Park
Mount Jumbo Trails

NORTH HILLS TRAILS
Moon Randolph Homestead

SHORT TRIPS from MISSOULA
Cha-paa-qn/Sleeping Woman Trail
North Summit/Lolo Peak

 

 

SPRING GULCH - STUART PEAK TRAIL

Miles: 12 (7 miles to wilderness boundary)

Elevation gain: 3,838 feet (from 3,700 feet to 7,538 feet)

No dogs are allowed in the area Dec. 1-May 15. During the remaining months, dogs must be on a leash from the confluence of Spring Creek and Rattlesnake Creek to milepost 1.3.

Another popular Rattlesnake route, Stuart Peak Trail, branches off the main travel corridor at about the half-mile mark. For the next three miles, you follow an old farm lane along Spring Gulch. After a winding, steep climb for another four miles, you reach the wilderness boundary, near Stuart Peak.

At 7,960 feet, Stuart Peak is one of the Rattlesnake's highest points, offering great views of adjacent peaks and the Missoula Valley. There's no designated trail to the peak, but you can reach it by traveling cross-country for about a mile. From this vantage point, you can drop down to Twin Lakes or get back on the trail and head farther into the high country.

The trail continues northward past the Lake Creek drainage, which contains six lakes, and then descends past three more lakes into the Wrangle Creek drainage, where it joins the main travel corridor 15 miles for the trailhead.

Most of the high-country lakes have been stocked with cutthroat trout. However, there are no fish in Twin Lakes or Farmer's Lakes.

You'd be wise to carry plenty of water on this hike. It's demanding, and you can't always count on finding water along the way. If you do drink surface water, the Forest Service recommends that you boil or filter it first.

And please, tread lightly in this unique area. Because of its proximity to town, the Rattlensake receives a lot of use. Try to camp where there are established fire rings, pack out all that you carry in and be courteous to others you might encounter on the trail.

 

 

 

 

 

 
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